Lordship of Stoborough Former Crown Manor of Stoborough -  Isle of Purbeck - Dorsetshire
© Former Crown Manor of Stoborough Wareham - 2020-24 - A UNESCO World Heritage Region of Ancient Wessex Isle of Purbeck

Court Leet - Lords of Stoborough

Cout Leet - Liberty of Stoborough Manor

The Unique Authority of the Lord of Stoborough: Granting Ceremonial Titles Through Ancient Court Leet and Court Baron Rights of an English Liberty Historical Foundations of Liberties and Stoborough Libertys’ Distinct Status Liberties in the Middle Ages were unique administrative regions where regalian rights direct from the crown, typically reserved for the king, were delegated to a “Free Lord”, Lord Paramount or “Tenant in Chief”. These regions were not governed by the usual system of hundreds and boroughs but were defined by their unique charters of liberties. This historical framework is crucial for understanding the special authority of the Lord of Stoborough to grant ceremonial titles and positions such as Lord Mayor, Bailiff, or Justice of the Peace. The Historical Context and Autonomy of the Lords of Stoborough Liberty Stoborough Liberty, located in the Isle of Purbeck district of Dorset, is an ancient Royal Liberty known for its distinct governance structure. Central to this autonomy were the court leet and court baron, two manorial courts that empowered the Lord of the Manor to uphold local laws and appoint various officials. Unique Court Leet and Court Baron Rights The court leet and court baron of Stoborough Liberty hold a special place in its governance. The court leet, a traditional manorial court, was responsible for enforcing local laws and had the authority to appoint the mayor of the borough. The court baron, on the other hand, handled the administration of the manor's internal affairs, including disputes between tenants and manorial rights. To have a Lord Mayor, a settlement usually needed to be granted city rights (Charter o Liberties or Stadtrecht). These rights were often conferred by a regional prince, king, or emperor and gave the settlement specific legal and administrative privileges. In the Case of Stoborough, the liberties are direct from the Queen/King/Crown. These rare court leet powers provide the Lord of Stoborough with unique rights and powers to grant ceremonial titles and positions, reflecting the historical privileges and autonomy of the area. These include: 1. Honorable and Worshipful Mayor or Lord Mayor: The court leet empowers the Lord of Stoborough to appoint a jury to select a Mayor on St. Michael's Day, continuing an ancient tradition. Because Stoborough is a Manor with a Charter of Liberties, the Mayor would be a Lord Mayor just like in other small cities and villages such as: Hexham (Northumberland): The liberty of Hexham, under the control of the Archbishops of York, had its own unique system of local governance. The mayor, known as the "Bailiff," was appointed with significant input from the lord. Ripon (Yorkshire): The liberty of Ripon had a mayor chosen annually, with the lord of the manor (the Archbishop of York) playing a key role in the selection process. Tewkesbury (Gloucestershire): In Tewkesbury, the mayor was elected annually, with the lord of the manor exercising considerable influence over the town's affairs. 2. Justice of the Peace: Appointed through the court leet to administer local justice and oversee law and order within the liberty. 3. In the Past, the Jury may appoint a Coroner: Investigates sudden or unexplained deaths and holds inquests, a role rooted in the court baron's jurisdiction. 4. Economic Commissioner or Portreeve: Oversees economic activities, particularly markets and trade, appointed through the court baron. 5. Market Judges and Officials: Manage and regulate markets and fairs, ensuring compliance with trade laws, roles designated by the court baron. 6. Town Clerk: Manages records and documentation of local government functions, appointed through manorial court decisions. 7. Recorder: Legal officer who keeps records of court proceedings and acts as a legal advisor, a position rooted in the court leet's functions. 8. Gaoler (Jailer): Oversees the incarceration and management of prisoners, appointed by the court leet. 9. Surveyor of Highways: Responsible for the maintenance and repair of roads and bridges, a role established by the court baron. 10. Chamberlain: Oversees financial affairs and treasury management, appointed through the court baron's decisions. 11. Crier: Announces public notices and proclamations within the liberty, a traditional role from the court leet. Traditional Officials in Stoborough Manor Beyond these ceremonial titles, the Lord of Stoborough can appoint traditional manorial officials, reflecting the historical governance structure empowered by the court leet and court baron. These include: 1. Steward: Oversees the court leet and manages manorial court affairs, a key figure in both courts. 2. Reeve: Manages agricultural work and day-to-day operations of the manor, appointed through the court baron. 3. Bailiff: Ensures the collection of rents, fines, and other dues owed to the Lord, a role designated by the court leet. 4. Constable: Maintains peace and enforces law and order within the manor, appointed through the court leet. 5. Ale Taster: Ensures the quality of ale and beer sold within the manor, a role rooted in the court baron's regulations. 6. Hayward: Oversees the maintenance and protection of hedges, fences, and crops, appointed through the court baron. 7. Poundkeeper: Manages the manorial pound for stray animals, a traditional role established by the court baron. 8. Assessor: Evaluates property value and determines taxes or rent owed by tenants, appointed through the court baron. Conclusion The court leet and court baron of Stoborough Liberty uniquely empower the Lord of Stoborough to grant ceremonial titles and positions, reflecting the manor's historical autonomy and governance traditions. These courts' rights and powers are a testament to the rich history and distinctive administrative structure of Stoborough Liberty. By preserving these traditions, the Lord of Stoborough maintains a link to the past, honoring the historical significance and autonomy of the manor and its liberty. Stoborough Manor, Dorsetshire History Stoborough is a liberty, in the parish of the Holy Trinity, borough of Wareham, union of Wareham and Purbeck, Wareham division of Dorset, ¾ of a mile (S.) from Wareham. It is historically governed by a mayor, chosen at Michaelmas; appointed by a jury at the manor court. Stoborough is part of a UNESCO Heritage Site and the Jurassic Coast. Much of Stobrough’s Liberty is part of a flood plain where the foreshore is expansive. This is because Stoborough is part of the Isle of Purbeck with the River Fromme flows through Stoborough Manor and part of Stoborough and East Wall of Wareham area is part of the Poole Harbor. Stoborough is famous for being a key entry area for both the Romans and The Vikings. Even today, most English have a bit of Viking and Roman Blood from the occupations by the Scandanavian Danes and the Latin Italian Empire. The Danes invaded and occupied Stoborough-Wareham in 876, and only left after Alfred returned with an army and made a payment of Danegeld. In 998 they attacked again, and in 1015 an invasion led by King Canute left the town in ruins. The region was a Viking/Saxon royal burial place, notably that of King Beorhtric. Later, under the English feudal system, the Lord of the Manor had a duty to uphold the law and liberties of the Crown. Many manors were overseen and controlled by the court leet of the lords of the manor. There was a jury often made up of tenants, and local laws were enforced and fines levied against those who transgressed them. Court leets also appointed men to act as manorial officials; constable, ale-taster for instance. The court leet for the Liberty and Manor of Stoborough, or Stowborough, was unusual in that the court chose the mayor of the borough. This function was carried out until the 18th century and the new Lord of the manor, who is an international lawyer trained in civil and common law, has revived as an annual ceremonial tradition. A liberty was an English unit originating in the Middle Ages, traditionally defined as an area in which regalian right was revoked and where the land was held by a mesne lord (i.e. an area in which rights reserved to the king had been devolved into private hands). Stoborough Liberty included in the Hundred of Winfrith. Anciently around 1306, these lands of Stoborough were granted to the powerful Earle of Moreton and then the powerful De Stoke or “de Estok” family. After this, the manor was owned by the Trenchards of Wolveton but was forfeited to the crown in the 1400s and became a Crown Manor. King Richard granted Stoborough to William Claxton Esq on March 25th, 1484. The lordship was originally referred to as either Stoburgh, Stanberge or Stauberge which were part of the Domesday lands of Stowbergh /Stoburgh/Stoborough-Beastwelle next to Wareham. As the Domesday survey “Beastewelle” was held in demesne by the Earle of Moreton, and it was taxed for three hides. In after times it formed part of a manor called the manor of By-est-wall and Stoborough. An analysis of the Tax Returns suggests that it lay near or with the Hasler or Winfrith Hundred. https://www.opcdorset.org/EastStoke/EastStoke-Hutchins.htm 1306. William de Estok, knt. son and heir of William de Estok, knt. (“filius et heres Will’i quondam de Esok milit”) granted and confirmed by deed sand date to John de Estok and Alice his wife, all the lands and tenements in the vill of Berneston which fell to him by inheritance from William de Estok his father. 33 Edw. I. William de Stok was mainpernor of John de Turberville, knight of the shire for the county of Dorset; 3 Edw. II. he, by the name of William son of William de Estoke, settled land in Byestwall juxta Wareham, and in Cheeping Blaneford, on Johanna his wife as her jointure; and in 18 Edw. II. he settled in like manner on Matilda his second wife, lands in Stoborough or Stoburgh, Biestewalle, and Blaneford. William de Stoke – the name being still variously written Estokes, Estok, Estoks) was certified, pursuant to a writ dated 5 March, 9 Edw. II. as one of the lords of the townships of Briants Piddle Turberville, Worgrett, Westport, Bestwall, Woolridge, and Winterborn Vifhache. 22 Richard II. and 7 Hen. VI. the Earls of March held here half a fee, but they must have been only lords paramount. William de Stokes, who probably died before 20 Feb., 16 Edw. I. held the manors of Stoke St. Andrew’s, Bestwall and Stowbergh of Robert FitzPayne by knight’s service. 3 Edw. II. William son of William de Estoke settled a message and six hovates of land in Byestwall-juxta-Wareham on himself and Johanna his wife as her jointure. In 8 Edw. II. he settled a messuage and two carucates of land in Stoburgh “Stoborough” and Biestewall as a jointure on Matilda his second wife. Grant of Stoborough by King Richard, 1484, March 25 at Nottingham By p.s. Grant to the king's servant William Claxton, Esquire, and the heirs male of his body, for his good service against the rebels, of the manors or lordships of Godmanston, Wareham and Stoweborough, co. Dorset, late of John Trenchard, traitor, of the yearly value of 401. 6s. 11d., and Meriot, Bukland St. Mary and Long Sutton in the said county (sic), late of John Bevyn, traitor, of the yearly value of 261. 8s. 21., to hold with knights' fees, wards, marriages, reliefs, escheats, advowsons, lands, waters, woods, underwoods, stews, fisheries, stanks, mills, meadows, warrens, parks, courts, views of frank-pledge, fines, amercements, heriots, rents, services, reversions, liberties and commodities by knight-service and a rent of 100s. yearly. The Boundaries of Manor and Liberty of Stoborough in the 1832 Administrative Map of Dorset shows the Territory of Stoborough. •The Northern Border of Stoberough is Winfrith with the Frome River as Border. •The Western and Northwestern border is Wareham’s ancient Southeastern walls. This is the reason that Stoborough is referred to in the Domeday records as By the East Wall of Wareham. •West of Stoborough is the Hundredsbarrow Hundred. •South and South West boarders of Stoborough is the Hasilor or Hasler Hundred. •Hasilor or Hasler Hundred contains the parishes of: Arne, Church Knowle, East Holme, Kimmeridge, Steeple and Tyneham. •Wareham is still a borough. In some ancient records, Stoborough is part of the Wareham Borough. •The Winfrith Hundred contains the following: Coombe Keynes East Lulwort, East Stoke, Moreton (part), Owermoigne (later a separate liberty), Poxwell, Warmwell, Watercombe (from 1858), Winfrith, Newburgh, Woodsford
Stoborough Foreshore and Flood Plain
© Former Crown Manor of Stoborough - 2020-24 - Isle of Purbeck - UNESCO World Heritage Sites

Court Leet - Lords of

Stoborough

Cout Leet - Liberty of Stoborough

Manor

The Unique Authority of the Lord of Stoborough: Granting Ceremonial Titles Through Ancient Court Leet and Court Baron Rights of an English Liberty Historical Foundations of Liberties and Stoborough Libertys’ Distinct Status Liberties in the Middle Ages were unique administrative regions where regalian rights direct from the crown, typically reserved for the king, were delegated to a “Free Lord”, Lord Paramount or “Tenant in Chief”. These regions were not governed by the usual system of hundreds and boroughs but were defined by their unique charters of liberties. This historical framework is crucial for understanding the special authority of the Lord of Stoborough to grant ceremonial titles and positions such as Lord Mayor, Bailiff, or Justice of the Peace. The Historical Context and Autonomy of the Lords of Stoborough Liberty Stoborough Liberty, located in the Isle of Purbeck district of Dorset, is an ancient Royal Liberty known for its distinct governance structure. Central to this autonomy were the court leet and court baron, two manorial courts that empowered the Lord of the Manor to uphold local laws and appoint various officials. Unique Court Leet and Court Baron Rights The court leet and court baron of Stoborough Liberty hold a special place in its governance. The court leet, a traditional manorial court, was responsible for enforcing local laws and had the authority to appoint the mayor of the borough. The court baron, on the other hand, handled the administration of the manor's internal affairs, including disputes between tenants and manorial rights. To have a Lord Mayor, a settlement usually needed to be granted city rights (Charter o Liberties or Stadtrecht). These rights were often conferred by a regional prince, king, or emperor and gave the settlement specific legal and administrative privileges. In the Case of Stoborough, the liberties are direct from the Queen/King/Crown. These rare court leet powers provide the Lord of Stoborough with unique rights and powers to grant ceremonial titles and positions, reflecting the historical privileges and autonomy of the area. These include: 1. Honorable and Worshipful Mayor or Lord Mayor: The court leet empowers the Lord of Stoborough to appoint a jury to select a Mayor on St. Michael's Day, continuing an ancient tradition. Because Stoborough is a Manor with a Charter of Liberties, the Mayor would be a Lord Mayor just like in other small cities and villages such as: Hexham (Northumberland): The liberty of Hexham, under the control of the Archbishops of York, had its own unique system of local governance. The mayor, known as the "Bailiff," was appointed with significant input from the lord. Ripon (Yorkshire): The liberty of Ripon had a mayor chosen annually, with the lord of the manor (the Archbishop of York) playing a key role in the selection process. Tewkesbury (Gloucestershire): In Tewkesbury, the mayor was elected annually, with the lord of the manor exercising considerable influence over the town's affairs. 2. Justice of the Peace: Appointed through the court leet to administer local justice and oversee law and order within the liberty. 3. In the Past, the Jury may appoint a Coroner: Investigates sudden or unexplained deaths and holds inquests, a role rooted in the court baron's jurisdiction. 4. Economic Commissioner or Portreeve: Oversees economic activities, particularly markets and trade, appointed through the court baron. 5. Market Judges and Officials: Manage and regulate markets and fairs, ensuring compliance with trade laws, roles designated by the court baron. 6. Town Clerk: Manages records and documentation of local government functions, appointed through manorial court decisions. 7. Recorder: Legal officer who keeps records of court proceedings and acts as a legal advisor, a position rooted in the court leet's functions. 8. Gaoler (Jailer): Oversees the incarceration and management of prisoners, appointed by the court leet. 9. Surveyor of Highways: Responsible for the maintenance and repair of roads and bridges, a role established by the court baron. 10. Chamberlain: Oversees financial affairs and treasury management, appointed through the court baron's decisions. 11. Crier: Announces public notices and proclamations within the liberty, a traditional role from the court leet. Traditional Officials in Stoborough Manor Beyond these ceremonial titles, the Lord of Stoborough can appoint traditional manorial officials, reflecting the historical governance structure empowered by the court leet and court baron. These include: 1. Steward: Oversees the court leet and manages manorial court affairs, a key figure in both courts. 2. Reeve: Manages agricultural work and day- to-day operations of the manor, appointed through the court baron. 3. Bailiff: Ensures the collection of rents, fines, and other dues owed to the Lord, a role designated by the court leet. 4. Constable: Maintains peace and enforces law and order within the manor, appointed through the court leet. 5. Ale Taster: Ensures the quality of ale and beer sold within the manor, a role rooted in the court baron's regulations. 6. Hayward: Oversees the maintenance and protection of hedges, fences, and crops, appointed through the court baron. 7. Poundkeeper: Manages the manorial pound for stray animals, a traditional role established by the court baron. 8. Assessor: Evaluates property value and determines taxes or rent owed by tenants, appointed through the court baron. Conclusion The court leet and court baron of Stoborough Liberty uniquely empower the Lord of Stoborough to grant ceremonial titles and positions, reflecting the manor's historical autonomy and governance traditions. These courts' rights and powers are a testament to the rich history and distinctive administrative structure of Stoborough Liberty. By preserving these traditions, the Lord of Stoborough maintains a link to the past, honoring the historical significance and autonomy of the manor and its liberty. Stoborough Manor, Dorsetshire History Stoborough is a liberty, in the parish of the Holy Trinity, borough of Wareham, union of Wareham and Purbeck, Wareham division of Dorset, ¾ of a mile (S.) from Wareham. It is historically governed by a mayor, chosen at Michaelmas; appointed by a jury at the manor court. Stoborough is part of a UNESCO Heritage Site and the Jurassic Coast. Much of Stobrough’s Liberty is part of a flood plain where the foreshore is expansive. This is because Stoborough is part of the Isle of Purbeck with the River Fromme flows through Stoborough Manor and part of Stoborough and East Wall of Wareham area is part of the Poole Harbor. Stoborough is famous for being a key entry area for both the Romans and The Vikings. Even today, most English have a bit of Viking and Roman Blood from the occupations by the Scandanavian Danes and the Latin Italian Empire. The Danes invaded and occupied Stoborough- Wareham in 876, and only left after Alfred returned with an army and made a payment of Danegeld. In 998 they attacked again, and in 1015 an invasion led by King Canute left the town in ruins. The region was a Viking/Saxon royal burial place, notably that of King Beorhtric. Later, under the English feudal system, the Lord of the Manor had a duty to uphold the law and liberties of the Crown. Many manors were overseen and controlled by the court leet of the lords of the manor. There was a jury often made up of tenants, and local laws were enforced and fines levied against those who transgressed them. Court leets also appointed men to act as manorial officials; constable, ale-taster for instance. The court leet for the Liberty and Manor of Stoborough, or Stowborough, was unusual in that the court chose the mayor of the borough. This function was carried out until the 18th century and the new Lord of the manor, who is an international lawyer trained in civil and common law, has revived as an annual ceremonial tradition. A liberty was an English unit originating in the Middle Ages, traditionally defined as an area in which regalian right was revoked and where the land was held by a mesne lord (i.e. an area in which rights reserved to the king had been devolved into private hands). Stoborough Liberty included in the Hundred of Winfrith. Anciently around 1306, these lands of Stoborough were granted to the powerful Earle of Moreton and then the powerful De Stoke or “de Estok” family. After this, the manor was owned by the Trenchards of Wolveton but was forfeited to the crown in the 1400s and became a Crown Manor. King Richard granted Stoborough to William Claxton Esq on March 25th, 1484. The lordship was originally referred to as either Stoburgh, Stanberge or Stauberge which were part of the Domesday lands of Stowbergh /Stoburgh/Stoborough- Beastwelle next to Wareham. As the Domesday survey “Beastewelle” was held in demesne by the Earle of Moreton, and it was taxed for three hides. In after times it formed part of a manor called the manor of By-est-wall and Stoborough. An analysis of the Tax Returns suggests that it lay near or with the Hasler or Winfrith Hundred. https://www.opcdorset.org/EastStoke/EastSto ke-Hutchins.htm 1306. William de Estok, knt. son and heir of William de Estok, knt. (“filius et heres Will’i quondam de Esok milit”) granted and confirmed by deed sand date to John de Estok and Alice his wife, all the lands and tenements in the vill of Berneston which fell to him by inheritance from William de Estok his father. 33 Edw. I. William de Stok was mainpernor of John de Turberville, knight of the shire for the county of Dorset; 3 Edw. II. he, by the name of William son of William de Estoke, settled land in Byestwall juxta Wareham, and in Cheeping Blaneford, on Johanna his wife as her jointure; and in 18 Edw. II. he settled in like manner on Matilda his second wife, lands in Stoborough or Stoburgh, Biestewalle, and Blaneford. William de Stoke – the name being still variously written Estokes, Estok, Estoks) was certified, pursuant to a writ dated 5 March, 9 Edw. II. as one of the lords of the townships of Briants Piddle Turberville, Worgrett, Westport, Bestwall, Woolridge, and Winterborn Vifhache. 22 Richard II. and 7 Hen. VI. the Earls of March held here half a fee, but they must have been only lords paramount. William de Stokes, who probably died before 20 Feb., 16 Edw. I. held the manors of Stoke St. Andrew’s, Bestwall and Stowbergh of Robert FitzPayne by knight’s service. 3 Edw. II. William son of William de Estoke settled a message and six hovates of land in Byestwall-juxta-Wareham on himself and Johanna his wife as her jointure. In 8 Edw. II. he settled a messuage and two carucates of land in Stoburgh “Stoborough” and Biestewall as a jointure on Matilda his second wife. Grant of Stoborough by King Richard, 1484, March 25 at Nottingham By p.s. Grant to the king's servant William Claxton, Esquire, and the heirs male of his body, for his good service against the rebels, of the manors or lordships of Godmanston, Wareham and Stoweborough, co. Dorset, late of John Trenchard, traitor, of the yearly value of 401. 6s. 11d., and Meriot, Bukland St. Mary and Long Sutton in the said county (sic), late of John Bevyn, traitor, of the yearly value of 261. 8s. 21., to hold with knights' fees, wards, marriages, reliefs, escheats, advowsons, lands, waters, woods, underwoods, stews, fisheries, stanks, mills, meadows, warrens, parks, courts, views of frank-pledge, fines, amercements, heriots, rents, services, reversions, liberties and commodities by knight-service and a rent of 100s. yearly. The Boundaries of Manor and Liberty of Stoborough in the 1832 Administrative Map of Dorset shows the Territory of Stoborough. •The Northern Border of Stoberough is Winfrith with the Frome River as Border. •The Western and Northwestern border is Wareham’s ancient Southeastern walls. This is the reason that Stoborough is referred to in the Domeday records as By the East Wall of Wareham. •West of Stoborough is the Hundredsbarrow Hundred. •South and South West boarders of Stoborough is the Hasilor or Hasler Hundred. •Hasilor or Hasler Hundred contains the parishes of: Arne, Church Knowle, East Holme, Kimmeridge, Steeple and Tyneham. •Wareham is still a borough. In some ancient records, Stoborough is part of the Wareham Borough. •The Winfrith Hundred contains the following: Coombe Keynes East Lulwort, East Stoke, Moreton (part), Owermoigne (later a separate liberty), Poxwell, Warmwell, Watercombe (from 1858), Winfrith, Newburgh, Woodsford
Foreshore and Flood Zone of Stoborough