Lordship of Stoborough Former Crown Manor of Stoborough -  Isle of Purbeck - Dorsetshire
© Former Crown Manor of Stoborough Wareham - 2020-21

More about The Isle of Purbeck, Dorsetshire

Ancient Feudal Lordship and former “Crown Manor” of Stoborough

The Manor of Stoborough (Part of Ancient Feudal Wareham) lies in one of the wildest and beautiful parts of the Dorsetshire.

Map of Dorsetshire

The Romans arrived in Dorset during their conquest of Britain in AD 43 and called it Durnovaria. By the end of the 7th century Dorset had fallen under Saxon control and been incorporated into the Kingdom of Wessex. Stoborough is on the river Frome on the penninsula or Island of Purbeck, and has access to the sea.

Stoborough Nature

A SSSI area of woods and wet and dry heathland with dartford warblers, skylarks and nightjars as the main avian attractions. Insect lovers may bump into the intriguing named wartbiter cricket. Administered via the RSPB Arne reserve in Poole harbour.

Dorsetshire Map with “Isle of Purbeck”

Celtic Kingdom of Durotricia

In 1870-72, John Marius Wilson's Imperial Gazetteer of England and Wales described Stoborough like this: STOBOROUGH, a liberty in Wareham-Holy Trinity parish, Dorset; within Wareham borough. Real property, £1,030. Pop., 346. Houses, 81. STOBOROUGH, a liberty, in the parish of the Holy Trinity, borough of WAREHAM, Wareham Division, of the county of DORSET. It was historically governed by a court leet and mayor, chosen annually at Michaelmas. As the Domesday survey “Beastewelle” was held in demesne by the Earle of Moreton, and it was taxed for three hides. In after times it formed part of a manor called the manor of By-est-wall and Stoborough. “Beastewelle, Lolowerde, Loloworde, Stoches,” and “Stanberge,” are surveyed consecutively in Domesday. One of these Lolowordes was probably Lullworth St. Andrew’s, the other may possibly be Belhuish, both Lullworth St. Andrew’s and Belhuish being in the parish of East Stoke; and Stanberge, though supposed by Hutchins to be Stanbridge in Little Hinton, was no doubt Stanberge or Stowborough, part of which is in the same parish. All were held in demesne by the Earl of Moreton. Both Beastewelle and Stoches belonged to Edmer in the time of the Confessor, and all in after times were the property of the family of De Stoke. The co-heirs of Chauntmarle married William Cheverel and John Jordan, and the estates of the Stoke family being partitioned between them, the manor of Biestwall and Stoborough came to the Trenchards of Wolveton and Lytchett in right of Christian, wife of Henry Trenchard, daughter and heir of John Mohun by Johanna daughter and heir of John Jordan of Wolveton. Stowborough, Great part of Stowborough Manor is in the parish of the Holy Trinity in Wareham, but the western portion of the Lordship boundaries is in the parish of East Stoke. There are many historical references to “Stanberge” in the Domesday Dorset lists. It is variously spelled Stoburgh and Stauberge, and it afterwards formed part of a manor styled the manor of Bestwall and Stoborough. Later to be the Manor of Stoborough which included the Liberty and Court Leet. https://www.opcdorset.org/EastStoke/EastStoke-Hutchins.htm King Richard, 1484, March 25 at Nottingham By p.s. Grant to the king's servant William Claxton, esquire, and the heirs male of his body, for his good service against the rebels, of the manors or lordships of Godmanston, Wareham and Stoweborough, co. Dorset, late of John Trenchard, traitor, of the yearly value of 401. 6s. 11d., and Meriot, Bukland St. Mary and Long Sutton in the said county (sic), late of John Bevyn, traitor, of the yearly value of 261. 8s. 21., to hold with knights' fees, wards, marriages, reliefs, escheats, advowsons, lands, waters, woods, underwoods, stews, fisheries, stanks, mills, meadows, warrens, parks, courts, views of frank-pledge, fines, amercements, heriots, rents, services, reversions, liberties and commodities by knight-service and a rent of 100s. yearly. Etymology 'Stony hill or barrow', v. stān , beorg , cf. Warham par. infra .For the loss of ME -n - before a labial consonant, cf. W Stafford par. infra ; for the replacement of the second el. by burh 'fortification', cf. Charborough in Morden par. infra . There was a mill here in 1086 DB (VCHDo 387), cf. the mention of a water mill here or in Worgret infra in 1409 Hutch3 1415.
King Richard, 1484, March 25 at Nottingham
Kings Barrow The ancient burial places of Danes or Vikings occurred in the Manor of Stoborough. The monument includes a bowl barrow situated on a low ridge occupying the northern edge of Stoborough Heath within the Isle of Purbeck, overlooking the Frome Valley to the north. The site, which is known as the King's Barrow, has a mound composed of earth, sand and turf with a maximum diameter of 20m and a maximum height of c.1.5m. This is surrounded by a ditch from which material was quarried during the construction of the monument. This has become infilled over the years, but will survive as a buried feature 2m wide. The barrow was partly excavated during 1767 when a primary inhumation without a skull was found wrapped in stitched animal skins within a hollowed out wooden coffin which was 3m long, 1.2m wide and 0.9m deep and orientated north west by south east. The burial was associated with a probable shale cup; this has since been lost, although illustrations suggest that it was decorated with incised lines.
Stanberge
 
1086
 
DB
 
1284
 
Cl
Stanbe(r)gh
 
1293
 
Ipm
Stabergh
 
1253
 
Drew
 
1280
 
Ass
 
14
 
Wim
 
1319
 
MinAcct
Staberge
 
p1483
 
Sheen
Stoburgh(e)
 
1315,1412
 
FF
Stoburgh(e) iuxta Warham
 
1477
 
DCMDeed
 
1483
 
MinAcct
 
1495
 
Ipm
Stobargh
 
1431
 
FA
Stobor(r)o(u)gh(e)
 
1512,1546
 
Ct
 
1585,1632
 
Pitt
Borough of Stoburgh
 
1664
 
HTax
Stobroghe
 
1513
 
Ct
Stobrowe
 
1545
 
ib
Stoburrough
 
1624
 
DCMDeed
Stoborrow
 
1707
 
Eg
Stoughborough
 
1515
 
Ct
Stowboro(we)
 
1535
 
Ct
 
1575
 
Saxton
 
c.1586
 
Tres
Stowborough
 
1773
 
Bayly
Stouborowe
 
1539
 
Ct
Stoveberowe
 
c.1628
 
Strode
© Former Crown Manor of Stoborough - 2020-21

More about The Isle of Purbeck,

Dorsetshire

Ancient Feudal Lordship and

former “Crown Manor” of

Stoborough

The Manor of Stoborough (Part of Ancient Feudal Wareham) lies in one of the wildest and beautiful parts of the Dorsetshire.

Map of Dorsetshire

The Romans arrived in Dorset during their conquest of Britain in AD 43 and called it Durnovaria. By the end of the 7th century Dorset had fallen under Saxon control and been incorporated into the Kingdom of Wessex. Stoborough is on the river Frome on the penninsula or Island of Purbeck, and has access to the sea.

Stoborough Nature

A SSSI area of woods and wet and dry heathland with dartford warblers, skylarks and nightjars as the main avian attractions. Insect lovers may bump into the intriguing named wartbiter cricket. Administered via the RSPB Arne reserve in Poole harbour.

Dorsetshire Map with “Isle of Purbeck”

Celtic Kingdom of Durotricia

In 1870-72, John Marius Wilson's Imperial Gazetteer of England and Wales described Stoborough like this: STOBOROUGH, a liberty in Wareham-Holy Trinity parish, Dorset; within Wareham borough. Real property, £1,030. Pop., 346. Houses, 81. STOBOROUGH, a liberty, in the parish of the Holy Trinity, borough of WAREHAM, Wareham Division, of the county of DORSET. It was historically governed by a court leet and mayor, chosen annually at Michaelmas. As the Domesday survey “Beastewelle” was held in demesne by the Earle of Moreton, and it was taxed for three hides. In after times it formed part of a manor called the manor of By-est-wall and Stoborough. “Beastewelle, Lolowerde, Loloworde, Stoches,” and “Stanberge,” are surveyed consecutively in Domesday. One of these Lolowordes was probably Lullworth St. Andrew’s, the other may possibly be Belhuish, both Lullworth St. Andrew’s and Belhuish being in the parish of East Stoke; and Stanberge, though supposed by Hutchins to be Stanbridge in Little Hinton, was no doubt Stanberge or Stowborough, part of which is in the same parish. All were held in demesne by the Earl of Moreton. Both Beastewelle and Stoches belonged to Edmer in the time of the Confessor, and all in after times were the property of the family of De Stoke. The co-heirs of Chauntmarle married William Cheverel and John Jordan, and the estates of the Stoke family being partitioned between them, the manor of Biestwall and Stoborough came to the Trenchards of Wolveton and Lytchett in right of Christian, wife of Henry Trenchard, daughter and heir of John Mohun by Johanna daughter and heir of John Jordan of Wolveton. Stowborough, Great part of Stowborough Manor is in the parish of the Holy Trinity in Wareham, but the western portion of the Lordship boundaries is in the parish of East Stoke. There are many historical references to “Stanberge” in the Domesday Dorset lists. It is variously spelled Stoburgh and Stauberge, and it afterwards formed part of a manor styled the manor of Bestwall and Stoborough. Later to be the Manor of Stoborough which included the Liberty and Court Leet. https://www.opcdorset.org/EastStoke/EastStoke- Hutchins.htm King Richard, 1484, March 25 at Nottingham By p.s. Grant to the king's servant William Claxton, esquire, and the heirs male of his body, for his good service against the rebels, of the manors or lordships of Godmanston, Wareham and Stoweborough, co. Dorset, late of John Trenchard, traitor, of the yearly value of 401. 6s. 11d., and Meriot, Bukland St. Mary and Long Sutton in the said county (sic), late of John Bevyn, traitor, of the yearly value of 261. 8s. 21., to hold with knights' fees, wards, marriages, reliefs, escheats, advowsons, lands, waters, woods, underwoods, stews, fisheries, stanks, mills, meadows, warrens, parks, courts, views of frank-pledge, fines, amercements, heriots, rents, services, reversions, liberties and commodities by knight-service and a rent of 100s. yearly. Etymology 'Stony hill or barrow', v. stān , beorg , cf. Warham par. infra .For the loss of ME -n - before a labial consonant, cf. W Stafford par. infra ; for the replacement of the second el. by burh 'fortification', cf. Charborough in Morden par. infra . There was a mill here in 1086 DB (VCHDo 387), cf. the mention of a water mill here or in Worgret infra in 1409 Hutch3 1415.