Lordship of Stoborough Former Crown Manor of Stoborough -  Isle of Purbeck - Dorsetshire
© Former Crown Manor of Stoborough Wareham - 2020-21

News

A Thousand Years of History

Stoborough Water and Heaths

The Manor of Stoborough has waterways and rivers running through it with various heaths surrounding the manor. Stoborough Heath is within the parameters of Stoborough and the borders of Stoborough include marshes and the River Frome. According to a list of Common Property, there are about 1000 acres of Common Land in the region of Stoborough Manor. Most if not all of the Common Land is in Preservation. Local Heathlands include: Stoborough Green, Stoborough Heath, Slepe Heath, Middlebere Heath, Arne Health which are about 1906 acres See: The Common Lands of England & Wales by William George Hoskins, Laurence Dudley Stamp Collins, 1963 - Commons - 366 pages

Stoborough Pottery

According to historical documents, it is said that the clay that produces the Queens Weare is from Stoborough . Year 1772

Stoborough Oil Drilling

it is in the Purbeck area, however, that the most promising finds so far have been made, with oil already being produced from wells drilled at Stoborough and Wareham. In 1964 oil was found on a site at Trigon near Wareham, and since late 1970 a donkey pump has been extracting oil at this site. The most exciting find to date has been the oilfield at Wytch Farm some 2.5 miles north-east of Corfe Castle where, in 1974, oilwas tapped at between 3,000 feet and 4,000 feet. three further wells were drilled in 1975, and it was evident that this would be a commercially viable field larger than any other yet discovered on land in Britain. In 1977 a new exploratory well was sunk to a greater depth and a further oil-bearing stratum discovered. It now appears that the oil reserves in this field may be comparable to those of the smaller oil fields in the North Sea.

Mining in Stoborough

Stoborough - Wareham Lordship and Liberty - Mining and Minerals There is some evidence of interests in clay mining by other land owners including the 1st Baron Rivers. In 1777 a copy of a lease between the ‘Right Hon George, Baron Rivers of Stratfield Saye and Hon George Pitt, his son’ and Matthew Colthurst mentions the right of John Pitt and Edward Morton Pitt ‘to dig clay on commons of Arne, Slepe and Stoborough’ (D/SEN/3/3/2/1) In 1840, Lord Rivers granted a lease for 21 years to William J. Pike and John W. Pike for the right to build a tramway from their clay pits at Furzebrook over Stoborough Heath to the River Frome at Ridge (D/SEN/16/2/30). This was known as Furzebrook Railway, the route of which lies 850m west of the current property boundary In 1849 a valuation was conducted of Lord Rivers’ estates, ‘comprising the manors of Arne, Slepe and Stoborough, and farms called Worgret and Westport’, prior to their sale (D/SEN/16/5/49). ‘Sleap Common Heath’ is recorded as encompassing 733 acres and is valued at £165 12s 7d, although according to another part of the valuation ‘Sleap Heath’ only covers 674 acres

Stoborough Heath

In Dorsetshire, there are beautiful heaths. Great part of Stowborough is in the parish of the Holy Trinity in Wareham, but the western portion of it is in the parish of East Stoke. This seems to be the “Stanberge” of Domesday, possibly a clerical error for Stauberge, and it afterwards formed part of a manor styled the manor of Bestwall and Stoborough. Its early history is involved in that of Bestwall.

Stoborough Rivers and Water

1911 Encyclopedia Britannica Water Rights By the law of England the property in the bed and water of a tidal river, as high as the tide ebbs and flows at a medium spring tide, is presumed to be in the crown or as a franchise in a grantee of the crown, such as the lord of a manor, or a district council, and to be extra-parochial. The bed and water of a non-tidal river are presumed to belong to the person through whose land it flows, or, if it divide two properties, to the riparian proprietors, the rights of each extending to midstream (ad medium filum aquae). In order to give riparian rights, the river must flow in a defined channel, or at least above ground. A freshwater lake appears to be governed by the same law as a non- tidal river, surface water being pars soli. The preponderance of authority is in favour of the right of the riparian proprietors as against the crown. Most of the law will be found in Bristow v. Cormican, 1878, 3 A.C. 648. https://www.studylight.org/encyclopedias/eng/bri/w/water- rights.html Riparian rights are ancient legal rights that attach to waterfront property by virtue of that property actually meeting the river or harbor or ocean shoreline. They're the manorial rights of the waterfront property owner to gain access to the water or to gain access to their property from the water. They exist with the property regardless of whether or not they're mentioned in a deed, and these water related rights are passed on with the ownership of the waterfront property. Riparian manorial rights give the waterfront property owner the right to access the water, to use the water in front of their property. They give the waterfront property owner the rights of relatively unobstructed view of the water, and in many cases the rights to build a boat area, dock or docking facilities to aid in access to the waters. These rights also grant the waterfront property owner the right to gain ownership via the expansion of land in the event that sand or shoreline builds up through accretion.

Hunting, Fishing, and GameKeepers !

A LIST of GAMEKEEPERS' CERTIFICATES issued in and for the said Dorset County, by virtue of Deputations and Appointments duly registered, between the 1st day of July, 1803, and the 8th day of September following : with the Names of the Persons deputing, and of the Manors or Lands for which they are deputed. Persons deputed” Mr. While, Francis; The Person deputing: Tho. Bartlett, esq., The Manors or Lands of Game Hunting: Stoborough Manor. Citation
© Former Crown Manor of Stoborough - 2020-21

News

A Thousand Years of History

Stoborough Water and Heaths

The Manor of Stoborough has waterways and rivers running through it with various heaths surrounding the manor. Stoborough Heath is within the parameters of Stoborough and the borders of Stoborough include marshes and the River Frome. According to a list of Common Property, there are about 1000 acres of Common Land in the region of Stoborough Manor. Most if not all of the Common Land is in Preservation. Local Heathlands include: Stoborough Green, Stoborough Heath, Slepe Heath, Middlebere Heath, Arne Health which are about 1906 acres See: The Common Lands of England & Wales by William George Hoskins, Laurence Dudley Stamp Collins, 1963 - Commons - 366 pages

Stoborough Pottery

According to historical documents, it is said that the clay that produces the Queens Weare is from Stoborough . Year 1772

Stoborough Oil Drilling

it is in the Purbeck area, however, that the most promising finds so far have been made, with oil already being produced from wells drilled at Stoborough and Wareham. In 1964 oil was found on a site at Trigon near Wareham, and since late 1970 a donkey pump has been extracting oil at this site. The most exciting find to date has been the oilfield at Wytch Farm some 2.5 miles north-east of Corfe Castle where, in 1974, oilwas tapped at between 3,000 feet and 4,000 feet. three further wells were drilled in 1975, and it was evident that this would be a commercially viable field larger than any other yet discovered on land in Britain. In 1977 a new exploratory well was sunk to a greater depth and a further oil-bearing stratum discovered. It now appears that the oil reserves in this field may be comparable to those of the smaller oil fields in the North Sea.

Mining in Stoborough

Stoborough - Wareham Lordship and Liberty - Mining and Minerals There is some evidence of interests in clay mining by other land owners including the 1st Baron Rivers. In 1777 a copy of a lease between the ‘Right Hon George, Baron Rivers of Stratfield Saye and Hon George Pitt, his son’ and Matthew Colthurst mentions the right of John Pitt and Edward Morton Pitt ‘to dig clay on commons of Arne, Slepe and Stoborough’ (D/SEN/3/3/2/1) In 1840, Lord Rivers granted a lease for 21 years to William J. Pike and John W. Pike for the right to build a tramway from their clay pits at Furzebrook over Stoborough Heath to the River Frome at Ridge (D/SEN/16/2/30). This was known as Furzebrook Railway, the route of which lies 850m west of the current property boundary In 1849 a valuation was conducted of Lord Rivers’ estates, ‘comprising the manors of Arne, Slepe and Stoborough, and farms called Worgret and Westport’, prior to their sale (D/SEN/16/5/49). ‘Sleap Common Heath’ is recorded as encompassing 733 acres and is valued at £165 12s 7d, although according to another part of the valuation ‘Sleap Heath’ only covers 674 acres

Stoborough Heath

In Dorsetshire, there are beautiful heaths. Great part of Stowborough is in the parish of the Holy Trinity in Wareham, but the western portion of it is in the parish of East Stoke. This seems to be the “Stanberge” of Domesday, possibly a clerical error for Stauberge, and it afterwards formed part of a manor styled the manor of Bestwall and Stoborough. Its early history is involved in that of Bestwall.

Stoborough Rivers and Water

1911 Encyclopedia Britannica Water Rights By the law of England the property in the bed and water of a tidal river, as high as the tide ebbs and flows at a medium spring tide, is presumed to be in the crown or as a franchise in a grantee of the crown, such as the lord of a manor, or a district council, and to be extra-parochial. The bed and water of a non-tidal river are presumed to belong to the person through whose land it flows, or, if it divide two properties, to the riparian proprietors, the rights of each extending to midstream (ad medium filum aquae). In order to give riparian rights, the river must flow in a defined channel, or at least above ground. A freshwater lake appears to be governed by the same law as a non-tidal river, surface water being pars soli. The preponderance of authority is in favour of the right of the riparian proprietors as against the crown. Most of the law will be found in Bristow v. Cormican, 1878, 3 A.C. 648. https://www.studylight.org/encyclopedias/eng/bri/w /water-rights.html Riparian rights are ancient legal rights that attach to waterfront property by virtue of that property actually meeting the river or harbor or ocean shoreline. They're the manorial rights of the waterfront property owner to gain access to the water or to gain access to their property from the water. They exist with the property regardless of whether or not they're mentioned in a deed, and these water related rights are passed on with the ownership of the waterfront property. Riparian manorial rights give the waterfront property owner the right to access the water, to use the water in front of their property. They give the waterfront property owner the rights of relatively unobstructed view of the water, and in many cases the rights to build a boat area, dock or docking facilities to aid in access to the waters. These rights also grant the waterfront property owner the right to gain ownership via the expansion of land in the event that sand or shoreline builds up through accretion.

Hunting, Fishing, and

GameKeepers !

A LIST of GAMEKEEPERS' CERTIFICATES issued in and for the said Dorset County, by virtue of Deputations and Appointments duly registered, between the 1st day of July, 1803, and the 8th day of September following : with the Names of the Persons deputing, and of the Manors or Lands for which they are deputed. Persons deputed” Mr. While, Francis; The Person deputing: Tho. Bartlett, esq., The Manors or Lands of Game Hunting: Stoborough Manor. Citation