Lordship of Stoborough Former Crown Manor of Stoborough -  Isle of Purbeck - Dorsetshire
© Former Crown Manor of Stoborough Wareham - 2020-21

History of the Manor

The Ancient Manor of Stoburgh

The Manor of Stoborough

Stoborough Pedigree - The Crown and Earls

Anciently, Stoborough belonged to the Count of Mortain who was Robert, Earl of Cornwall a Norman nobleman and the half-brother of King William the Conqueror. Tenant-in-Chief 1086 demesne estates. BESTWALL. Domesday Beastewelle meaning '[place] to the east of the [town] wall' (Place-Names of Dorset, i. p. 158), the town being Wareham. The holding can be located in Bere Hundred by an analysis of its Tax Return, though it was later in Winfrith Hundred; see 49,14 Hethfelton note. In Feudal Aids, ii. p. 42, Byestewall is held by William de Estok in Barrow Hundred. The same man holds [East] Stoke (26,52). EAST STOKE - Stoke juxta Bindon A pretty large vill, lying on the south side of the river Frome, about two miles and a half south from Comb Kaynes, in Dorchester deanery. Stoke in Saxon signifies a village, as Dugdale, Thoroton, and Skinner; which last derives the family name of Stoke from the trunk of a tree, q.d. de trunco vel stipite arboris, equivalent to the old French de Souche or Zouche. The in-parish lies scattered over what was once a large common, but is now much inclosed. The soil is generally healthy, but intermixed with arable and meadow. There are six parishes in this county called Stoke or Stock, as well as some smaller places so named, situated in other parishes. And there are eight parcels of land surveyed in the Domesday Book under the name of “Stoches” or “Stoke”. It is difficult, therefore, to distinguish with certainty the one from the other, or to identify existing localities with those mentioned in the Norman record. A careful examination of it, however, will often give grounds upon which reasonable conjectures may be formed. Thus, the one hide of land at “Stoche”, with its mill worth 30s., which was held by Edric, one of the King’s thanes, may be supposed to be East Stoke, because it is surveyed immediately after “Holne” and “Ristone” (Rushton), and all three were held by the same lord. But the term “at” Stoche, seems to imply that this lordship did not comprise the whole of the place Stoche; and as the Earl of Moreton held “Stoches”, surveyed immediately after “Beastwell, Loloworde”, and “Loloworde”, and followed by “Stanberge”, which places are probably Biestwall, Lulworth St. Andrew’s, Belhuish, and Stoborough, all now within the parish of East Stoke, and all anciently the property of the family of Stoke, it is pretty certain that this “Stoches” also may be identified as part of East Stoke. The Count/Earl of Moreton or Mortain held it in demesne, and before the Conquest it belonged to Edmer, when it was taxed for two hides. There was a mill, and the whole was worth 50s. after this the chief lords of the manor seem to have been the De Lincolns, and their descendents and co- representatives the Fitz Paynes, under whom it was held by a family which derived its name from this place. 12 Hen. II Eustachius de Stokes held one fee of Alurid de Lincoln of the old feoffment. He took part with John Earl of Moreton, afterwards King John, in his rebellion against Richard I., while the latter was kept in prison by the Emperor of Germany, and the King on his return to England seized his lands, which, however, were soon restored to him on payment of a fine. 7 Richard I. Eustace de Stokes owed the King 40s because he had been with Earl John, and two marks to have his land at Lullewurd which had been seized by the King for the same cause. In the following year he paid these sums, and had his “quietus”. ** Citation - Extract from the third edition of “The History and Antiquities of the County of Dorset” by John HUTCHINS, edited by W. SHIPP & J. W. HODSON, published by J. B. Nichols & Sons, Westminster, 1860- 74 1306. William de Estok, knt. son and heir of William de Estok, knt. (“filius et heres Will’i quondam de Esok milit”) granted and confirmed by deed sand date to John de Estok and Alice his wife, all the lands and tenements in the vill of Berneston which fell to him by inheritance from William de Estok his father. 33 Edw. I. William de Stok was mainpernor of John de Turberville, knight of the shire for the county of Dorset; 3 Edw. II. he, by the name of William son of William de Estoke, settled land in Byestwall juxta Wareham, and in Cheeping Blaneford, on Johanna his wife as her jointure; and in 18 Edw. II. he settled in like manner on Matilda his second wife, lands in Stoburgh, Biestewalle, and Blaneford. William de Stoke – the name being still variously written Estokes, Estok, Estoks) was certified, pursuant to a writ dated 5 March, 9 Edw. II. as one of the lords of the townships of Briants Piddle Turberville, Worgrett, Westport, Bestwall, Woolridge, and Winterborn Vifhache King Richard granted Stoborough to William Claxton Esq on March 25th, 1484. Before this, the manor was owned by the Trenchards of Wolveton but was forfeited to the crown and became a Crown Manor. The lordship was originally referred to as either Stoburgh, Stanberge or Stauberge which were part of the Domesday lands of Stowbergh /Stoburgh/Stoborough- Beastwelle next to Wareham. As the Domesday survey “Beastewelle” was held in demesne by the Earle of Moreton, and it was taxed for three hides. In after times it formed part of a manor called the manor of By-est-wall and Stoborough 22 Richard II. and 7 Hen. VI. the Earls of March held here half a fee, but they must have been only lords paramount. William de Stokes, who probably died before 20 Feb., 16 Edw. I. held the manors of Stoke St. Andrew’s, Bestwall and Stoborough - Stowbergh of Robert FitzPayne by knight’s service. 3 Edw. II. William son of William de Estoke settled a message and six hovates of land in Byestwall-juxta-Wareham on himself and Johanna his wife as her jointure. In 8 Edw. II. he settled a messuage and two carucates of land in StoboroStoburgh and Biestewall as a jointure on Matilda his second wife. Grant by King Richard, 1484, March 25 at Nottingham - By p.s. Grant to the king's servant William Claxton, esquire, and the heirs male of his body, for his good service against the rebels, of the manors or lordships of Godmanston, Wareham and Stoweborough, co. Dorset, late of John Trenchard, traitor, of the yearly value of 401. 6s. 11d., and Meriot, Bukland St. Mary and Long Sutton in the said county (sic), late of John Bevyn, traitor, of the yearly value of 261. 8s. 21., to hold with knights' fees, wards, marriages, reliefs, escheats, advowsons, lands, waters, woods, underwoods, stews, fisheries, stanks, mills, meadows, warrens, parks, courts, views of frank-pledge, fines, amercements, heriots, rents, services, reversions, liberties and commodities by knight-service and a rent of 100s. yearly. The Boundaries of Manor and Liberty of Stoborough in the 1832 Administrative Map of Dorset shows the Territory of Stoborough. •The Northern Border of Stoberough is Winfrith with the Frome River as Border. •The Western and Northwestern border is Wareham’s ancient Southeastern walls. This is the reason that Stoborough is referred to in the Domeday records as By the East Wall of Wareham. •West of Stoborough is the Hundredsbarrow Hundred. •South and South West boarders of Stoborough is the Hasilor or Hasler Hundred. •Hasilor or Hasler Hundred contains the parishes of: Arne, Church Knowle, East Holme, Kimmeridge, Steeple and Tyneham. •Wareham is still a borough. In some ancient records, Stoborough is part of the Wareham Borough. •The Winfrith Hundred contains the following: Coombe Keynes East Lulwort, East Stoke, Moreton (part), Owermoigne (later a separate liberty), Poxwell, Warmwell, Watercombe (from 1858), Winfrith, Newburgh, Woodsford A liberty was an English unit originating in the Middle Ages, traditionally defined as an area in which regalian right was revoked and where the land was held by a mesne lord (i.e. an area in which rights reserved to the king had been devolved into private hands). It later became a unit of local government administration.[1] Liberties were areas of widely variable extent which were independent of the usual system of hundreds and boroughs for a number of different reasons, usually to do with peculiarities of tenure. Because of their tenurial rather than geographical origin, the areas covered by liberties could either be widely scattered across a county or limited to an area smaller than a single parish: an example of the former is Fordington Liberty, and of the latter, the Liberty of Waybayouse, both in Dorset. A Lord Paramount is the highest authority, or that being of the greatest importance. The word was first used as a term of feudal law, of the overlord, the lord paramount, who held his fief from no superior lord, and was thus opposed to a mesne lord, one who held fief from a superior. In northern England, the liberty of Bowland was one of the larger tenurial configurations covering some ten manors, eight townships and four parishes under the sway of a single feudal lord, the Lord of Bowland, whose customary title is Lord of the Fells.[2][3] Up until 1660, such lords would have been lords paramount. The civil division of the county of Dorset By Edward Boswell Bailiffs of Hundreds and Liberties are appointed at the Courts Leet, held at Michaelmas yearly, or in default thereof by the Justices in Sessions, and frequently, if none are appointed, the Chief Constables do the duty. These officers execute the Precepts of the Justices within their Franchises, Hundreds, or Liberties; attend the Assizes or Quarter Sessions, collect Fines, summon Juries, &c., though of late years, for want of regular appointments to this office, the latter is done by the bound Bailiffs. The Civil Division of the County of Dorset was, from the time of our Saxon Ancestors, in HUNDREDS and Tithings and Officers, called the Hundredary and Tithingman, were elected and chosen to preside over each, and were the Civil Magistrates thereof. Out of these Hundreds certain Franchises, called Liberties and Boroughs have since been granted by the Crown to particular Persons, and to Bodies Corporate, and when the whole Hundred (which was frequently the case) has been granted, it has been historically called a Liberty. A certain Number of Tithings compose each Hundred and Liberty, and the Hundreds and Liberties (or Parts thereof) and Boroughs are placed into nine Divisionst, which now make up the County or Shire; the Civil Government and Administration of which are intrusted to certain Ministerial Officers and Magistrates, with other Persons having jurisdiction by substitution, delegation, or authority under them: such as the Clerk of the Peace, Under- Sheriff, County Clerk, Gaoler, Governor or Keeper of the House of Correction, and others, and are disposed in the following order: In Boswell's book about the Civil Divisiopn of Dorset, Stoborough is listed as a Liberty within which High Constables are elected and chosen, at the Courts Leet held at Michaelmas yearly; by the Lord of the Manor and his Jury or, in default, by the Justices at their Quarter Sessions; and such Constables are removable by the same authority that appoints them.—1 Salk' Rep' 150.- Black'Com' 1, p. 355.
Antique Picture of Stoborough
Pool Harbor Port of Isle of Purbeck
Wareham borough (which includes the three parishes of the Holy Trinity, St. Mary and St. Martin, and the liberty of STOBOROUGH,) contained, in 1831, 2,325 inhabitants, and by the last census (1841) 2,652. Historically, the parish of Holy Trinity (Wareham) includes the hamlets of Middlebere, Redge, and the Liberty of Stoborough. The were historically 3 parishes in teh Borough of Wareham including the: Parish of Lady St. Mary, the Parish of St. Martin, and the Parish of the Holy Trinity which are ecclesiastically united and form one parish. https://www.opcdorset.org/WarehamFiles/WarehamKellys1842.htm
© Former Crown Manor of Stoborough - 2020-21

History of the Manor

The Ancient Manor of Stoburgh

The Manor of Stoborough

Stoborough Pedigree - The Crown and Earls

Anciently, Stoborough belonged to the Count of Mortain who was Robert, Earl of Cornwall a Norman nobleman and the half-brother of King William the Conqueror. Tenant-in-Chief 1086 demesne estates. BESTWALL. Domesday Beastewelle meaning '[place] to the east of the [town] wall' (Place-Names of Dorset, i. p. 158), the town being Wareham. The holding can be located in Bere Hundred by an analysis of its Tax Return, though it was later in Winfrith Hundred; see 49,14 Hethfelton note. In Feudal Aids, ii. p. 42, Byestewall is held by William de Estok in Barrow Hundred. The same man holds [East] Stoke (26,52). EAST STOKE - Stoke juxta Bindon A pretty large vill, lying on the south side of the river Frome, about two miles and a half south from Comb Kaynes, in Dorchester deanery. Stoke in Saxon signifies a village, as Dugdale, Thoroton, and Skinner; which last derives the family name of Stoke from the trunk of a tree, q.d. de trunco vel stipite arboris, equivalent to the old French de Souche or Zouche. The in-parish lies scattered over what was once a large common, but is now much inclosed. The soil is generally healthy, but intermixed with arable and meadow. There are six parishes in this county called Stoke or Stock, as well as some smaller places so named, situated in other parishes. And there are eight parcels of land surveyed in the Domesday Book under the name of “Stoches” or “Stoke”. It is difficult, therefore, to distinguish with certainty the one from the other, or to identify existing localities with those mentioned in the Norman record. A careful examination of it, however, will often give grounds upon which reasonable conjectures may be formed. Thus, the one hide of land at “Stoche”, with its mill worth 30s., which was held by Edric, one of the King’s thanes, may be supposed to be East Stoke, because it is surveyed immediately after “Holne” and “Ristone” (Rushton), and all three were held by the same lord. But the term “at” Stoche, seems to imply that this lordship did not comprise the whole of the place Stoche; and as the Earl of Moreton held “Stoches”, surveyed immediately after “Beastwell, Loloworde”, and “Loloworde”, and followed by “Stanberge”, which places are probably Biestwall, Lulworth St. Andrew’s, Belhuish, and Stoborough, all now within the parish of East Stoke, and all anciently the property of the family of Stoke, it is pretty certain that this “Stoches” also may be identified as part of East Stoke. The Count/Earl of Moreton or Mortain held it in demesne, and before the Conquest it belonged to Edmer, when it was taxed for two hides. There was a mill, and the whole was worth 50s. after this the chief lords of the manor seem to have been the De Lincolns, and their descendents and co-representatives the Fitz Paynes, under whom it was held by a family which derived its name from this place. 12 Hen. II Eustachius de Stokes held one fee of Alurid de Lincoln of the old feoffment. He took part with John Earl of Moreton, afterwards King John, in his rebellion against Richard I., while the latter was kept in prison by the Emperor of Germany, and the King on his return to England seized his lands, which, however, were soon restored to him on payment of a fine. 7 Richard I. Eustace de Stokes owed the King 40s because he had been with Earl John, and two marks to have his land at Lullewurd which had been seized by the King for the same cause. In the following year he paid these sums, and had his “quietus”. ** Citation - Extract from the third edition of “The History and Antiquities of the County of Dorset” by John HUTCHINS, edited by W. SHIPP & J. W. HODSON, published by J. B. Nichols & Sons, Westminster, 1860-74 1306. William de Estok, knt. son and heir of William de Estok, knt. (“filius et heres Will’i quondam de Esok milit”) granted and confirmed by deed sand date to John de Estok and Alice his wife, all the lands and tenements in the vill of Berneston which fell to him by inheritance from William de Estok his father. 33 Edw. I. William de Stok was mainpernor of John de Turberville, knight of the shire for the county of Dorset; 3 Edw. II. he, by the name of William son of William de Estoke, settled land in Byestwall juxta Wareham, and in Cheeping Blaneford, on Johanna his wife as her jointure; and in 18 Edw. II. he settled in like manner on Matilda his second wife, lands in Stoburgh, Biestewalle, and Blaneford. William de Stoke – the name being still variously written Estokes, Estok, Estoks) was certified, pursuant to a writ dated 5 March, 9 Edw. II. as one of the lords of the townships of Briants Piddle Turberville, Worgrett, Westport, Bestwall, Woolridge, and Winterborn Vifhache King Richard granted Stoborough to William Claxton Esq on March 25th, 1484. Before this, the manor was owned by the Trenchards of Wolveton but was forfeited to the crown and became a Crown Manor. The lordship was originally referred to as either Stoburgh, Stanberge or Stauberge which were part of the Domesday lands of Stowbergh /Stoburgh/Stoborough- Beastwelle next to Wareham. As the Domesday survey “Beastewelle” was held in demesne by the Earle of Moreton, and it was taxed for three hides. In after times it formed part of a manor called the manor of By-est-wall and Stoborough 22 Richard II. and 7 Hen. VI. the Earls of March held here half a fee, but they must have been only lords paramount. William de Stokes, who probably died before 20 Feb., 16 Edw. I. held the manors of Stoke St. Andrew’s, Bestwall and Stoborough - Stowbergh of Robert FitzPayne by knight’s service. 3 Edw. II. William son of William de Estoke settled a message and six hovates of land in Byestwall-juxta-Wareham on himself and Johanna his wife as her jointure. In 8 Edw. II. he settled a messuage and two carucates of land in StoboroStoburgh and Biestewall as a jointure on Matilda his second wife. Grant by King Richard, 1484, March 25 at Nottingham - By p.s. Grant to the king's servant William Claxton, esquire, and the heirs male of his body, for his good service against the rebels, of the manors or lordships of Godmanston, Wareham and Stoweborough, co. Dorset, late of John Trenchard, traitor, of the yearly value of 401. 6s. 11d., and Meriot, Bukland St. Mary and Long Sutton in the said county (sic), late of John Bevyn, traitor, of the yearly value of 261. 8s. 21., to hold with knights' fees, wards, marriages, reliefs, escheats, advowsons, lands, waters, woods, underwoods, stews, fisheries, stanks, mills, meadows, warrens, parks, courts, views of frank-pledge, fines, amercements, heriots, rents, services, reversions, liberties and commodities by knight-service and a rent of 100s. yearly. The Boundaries of Manor and Liberty of Stoborough in the 1832 Administrative Map of Dorset shows the Territory of Stoborough. •The Northern Border of Stoberough is Winfrith with the Frome River as Border. •The Western and Northwestern border is Wareham’s ancient Southeastern walls. This is the reason that Stoborough is referred to in the Domeday records as By the East Wall of Wareham. •West of Stoborough is the Hundredsbarrow Hundred. •South and South West boarders of Stoborough is the Hasilor or Hasler Hundred. •Hasilor or Hasler Hundred contains the parishes of: Arne, Church Knowle, East Holme, Kimmeridge, Steeple and Tyneham. •Wareham is still a borough. In some ancient records, Stoborough is part of the Wareham Borough. •The Winfrith Hundred contains the following: Coombe Keynes East Lulwort, East Stoke, Moreton (part), Owermoigne (later a separate liberty), Poxwell, Warmwell, Watercombe (from 1858), Winfrith, Newburgh, Woodsford A liberty was an English unit originating in the Middle Ages, traditionally defined as an area in which regalian right was revoked and where the land was held by a mesne lord (i.e. an area in which rights reserved to the king had been devolved into private hands). It later became a unit of local government administration.[1] Liberties were areas of widely variable extent which were independent of the usual system of hundreds and boroughs for a number of different reasons, usually to do with peculiarities of tenure. Because of their tenurial rather than geographical origin, the areas covered by liberties could either be widely scattered across a county or limited to an area smaller than a single parish: an example of the former is Fordington Liberty, and of the latter, the Liberty of Waybayouse, both in Dorset. A Lord Paramount is the highest authority, or that being of the greatest importance. The word was first used as a term of feudal law, of the overlord, the lord paramount, who held his fief from no superior lord, and was thus opposed to a mesne lord, one who held fief from a superior. In northern England, the liberty of Bowland was one of the larger tenurial configurations covering some ten manors, eight townships and four parishes under the sway of a single feudal lord, the Lord of Bowland, whose customary title is Lord of the Fells.[2][3] Up until 1660, such lords would have been lords paramount. The civil division of the county of Dorset By Edward Boswell Bailiffs of Hundreds and Liberties are appointed at the Courts Leet, held at Michaelmas yearly, or in default thereof by the Justices in Sessions, and frequently, if none are appointed, the Chief Constables do the duty. These officers execute the Precepts of the Justices within their Franchises, Hundreds, or Liberties; attend the Assizes or Quarter Sessions, collect Fines, summon Juries, &c., though of late years, for want of regular appointments to this office, the latter is done by the bound Bailiffs. The Civil Division of the County of Dorset was, from the time of our Saxon Ancestors, in HUNDREDS and Tithings and Officers, called the Hundredary and Tithingman, were elected and chosen to preside over each, and were the Civil Magistrates thereof. Out of these Hundreds certain Franchises, called Liberties and Boroughs have since been granted by the Crown to particular Persons, and to Bodies Corporate, and when the whole Hundred (which was frequently the case) has been granted, it has been historically called a Liberty. A certain Number of Tithings compose each Hundred and Liberty, and the Hundreds and Liberties (or Parts thereof) and Boroughs are placed into nine Divisionst, which now make up the County or Shire; the Civil Government and Administration of which are intrusted to certain Ministerial Officers and Magistrates, with other Persons having jurisdiction by substitution, delegation, or authority under them: such as the Clerk of the Peace, Under-Sheriff, County Clerk, Gaoler, Governor or Keeper of the House of Correction, and others, and are disposed in the following order: In Boswell's book about the Civil Divisiopn of Dorset, Stoborough is listed as a Liberty within which High Constables are elected and chosen, at the Courts Leet held at Michaelmas yearly; by the Lord of the Manor and his Jury or, in default, by the Justices at their Quarter Sessions; and such Constables are removable by the same authority that appoints them.—1 Salk' Rep' 150.-Black'Com' 1, p. 355.